Why Socialism Means Slavery

Posted: 19th April 2018 by SouthernWatchman in FEE, labour, Slavery, society, SouthernWatch

FEE.ORGWhat is essential to the idea of a slave?

We primarily think of him as one who is owned by another. To be more than nominal, however, the ownership must be shown by control of the slave’s actions—a control which is habitually for the benefit of the controller. That which fundamentally distinguishes the slave is that he labours under coercion to satisfy another’s desires.

The relation admits of sundry gradations.

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REASONAfraidA. Barton Hinkle writes about how Americans across the ideological spectrum overly fear bad things happening, statistics be damned:

Take terrorism—reaction to which has given us the Patriot Act, Guantanamo, waterboarding, the TSA, police militarization, and domestic surveillance that makes Facebook’s data harvesting look like the magic X-ray glasses they advertise in comic books.

Yet how big is the terrorist threat to the average American? Vanishingly small: For the four-decade period from 1975 through 2015, the odds of an American dying in a terrorist attack carried out by a foreigner on U.S. soil have been 1 in 3.6 million. If that foreign terrorist is a refugee, the odds increase to 1 in 3.64 billion. And if that foreign terrorist is an illegal immigrant, the odds rise to 1 in 10.9 billion.

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TSP – TweetToday is an episode of TSP Rewind, commercial free versions of past podcast episodes. Today’s episode was originally, Episode-1769- Making and Using Herbal Medicines and was first published on April 19, 2016. The following are the original show notes from … Continue reading

RON PAUL INSTITUTEundefined If you are an American, have you asked yourself these questions?1. What purpose of mine is served by the US government’s making war in Iraq?
2. What purpose of mine is served by the US government’s making war in Afghanistan?
3. What purpose of mine is served by the US government’s making war in Syria?
4. What purpose of mine is served by the US government’s making war in Yemen?
5. What purpose of mine is served by the US government’s making war in Africa?
6. What purpose of mine would be served by the US government’s making war in Iran?Unless you are an unusual American, and if you are honest, your answer in each case would be, No purpose of mine is served by such war making.Yet US forces continue to make war in Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Yemen, and Africa with no prospect of discontinuation in sight, and the probability is substantial that US forces will attack Iran and that US actions in Syria will provoke direct fighting with the Russians supporting the Assad regime — fighting that might spiral out of control and eventuate in nuclear war. Why?Well, although relatively few Americans have any real interest served by these wars, a small minority does have an interest. The leading figures in this power elite are Zionists and politicos beholden to the Israel lobby, plus some people who thrive on any and all wars by virtue of their positions in the military-industrial-congressional complex.Chances are that these people are complete strangers to you. Their only connection with you is (a) to profit from funds extracted from you by the government, and (b) to keep you ideologically befuddled and factually misinformed so that you will not cause any major difficulty for them in their conduct of perpetual war. But aside from these two connections, nothing connects the great majority of Americans with the warfare state. It essentially runs on its own, answering to no one outside its own precincts and thriving on a pipeline to the taxpayers’ bank accounts.You pay for all of this endless death and destruction, average American, but you get less than nothing out of it. In short, you are a sap for evil and designing intriguers. If you are reflexively “supporting the troops,” you might want to reconsider playing the fool and having your intelligence insulted daily in the process.Higgs is a member of the Ron Paul Institute’s Board of Advisors.Reprinted with permission from the Independent Institute.View the full article here: http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/peace-and-prosperity/2018/april/13/us-war-making-what-s-in-it-for-you/

FEE.ORGSocialism is extremely in vogue. Opinion pieces which tell us to stop obsessing over socialism’s past failures, and start to get excited about its future potential, have almost become a genre in its own right.

For example, Bhaskhar Sunkara, the founder of Jacobin magazine, recently wrote a New York Times article, in which he claimed that the next attempt to build a socialist society will be completely different:

This time, people get to vote. Well, debate and deliberate and then vote – and have faith that people can organize together to chart new destinations for humanity. Stripped down to its essence, and returned to its roots, socialism is an ideology of radical democracy. […] [I]t seeks to empower civil society to allow participation in the decisions that affect our lives.”

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FEE.ORGNothing is so contagious as example; and we never do any great good or evil which does not produce its like. — Francois de la Rochefoucauld (1613-1680).

Heroes for liberty are not particular to any region of the world or to a particular time period or to one sex. They hail from all nationalities, races, faiths, and creeds. They inspire others to a noble and universal cause—that all people should be free to live their lives in peace so long as they do no harm to the equal rights of others. They are passionate not solely for their own liberty, but for that of others as well.

In my last book, Real Heroes: Inspiring True Stories of Courage, Character and Conviction, I wrote about 40 individuals whose views, decisions, and actions served this cause in various ways. That book planted the seed for this new weekly series to be published each Thursday at FEE.org. But this time, others from around the world will do the writing, and I’ll be content to do the editing while keeping that to a minimum to preserve the author’s voice. It is my hope that when all is said and done some months from now, the literature of liberty will be greatly complemented by this collection of short biographies. The authors will be writing about heroes for liberty who are (or were) citizens of each author’s own country. Each week’s installment will be added to the collection here.

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REASONLong before anyone was talking about the sharing economy, private pilots across the United States were already engaging in it. They used bulletin boards at general aviation airports to advertise planned trips to prospective passengers who might want to come along for the ride and share the costs of the flight.

Pilots do that because flying is an expensive hobby. The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association warns would-be aviators to be prepared to spend more than $225 an hour when all flying costs—including fuel, insurance, and airport fees—are included. Since private pilots have to log at least three takeoffs and landings every 90 days to maintain their licenses, there aren’t many viable ways to dodge those costs. So they’ve been sharing costs with passengers since at least the 1960s. For pilots, it’s a crucial method of financing a flying habit. For passengers, it’s an alternative way to reach a destination.

In the age of Uber, it has the potential to be much more. But the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) stands in the way.

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INTERNATIONAL LIBERTY – I’m in Brussels, where I’m participating in an “Economic Freedom Summit” on the unfriendly turf of the European Parliament.

My role was to chair a panel earlier today about whether Venezuela can recover from socialism. I obviously have an opinion on that topic, but I want to write today about some information that was shared on the panel about transition economies.

Andrei Illarionov, a former adviser to Vladimir Putin, gave a talk about economic reform in Russia. I also have an opinion on that topic, but that’s also not today’s issue.

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Handing Out Pamphlets Is Not a Crime

Posted: 19th April 2018 by SouthernWatchman in michigan, pamphlets, Reason, SouthernWatch

REASONBrian Thiede, the prosecuting attorney for Mecosta County, Michigan, wants to put Keith Wood in jail for handing out pamphlets. Yet Thiede says the pamphlets are perfectly legal, and so is handing them out.

The solution to this riddle lies in Thiede’s interpretation of Michigan’s jury tampering statute, which he says turns constitutionally protected speech into a crime. If the Michigan Court of Appeals agrees, Jacob Sullum says, it will be giving officials like Thiede a versatile tool to censor and punish people who offend them.

View the full article here: https://reason.com/blog/2018/04/11/handing-out-pamphlets-is-not-a-crime-new

At about 5 a.m., 700 British troops, on a mission to capture Patriot leaders and seize a Patriot arsenal, march into Lexington to find 77 armed minutemen under Captain John Parker waiting for them on the town’s common green. British Major John Pitcairn ordered the outnumbered Patriots to disperse, and after a moment’s hesitation the Americans began to drift off the green. Suddenly, the “shot heard around the world” was fired from an undetermined gun, and a cloud of musket smoke soon covered the green. When the brief Battle of Lexington ended, eight Americans lay dead or dying and 10 others were wounded. Only one British soldier was injured, but the American Revolution had begun.

By 1775, tensions between the American colonies and the British government approached the breaking point, especially in Massachusetts, where Patriot leaders formed a shadow revolutionary government and trained militias to prepare for armed conflict with the British troops occupying Boston. In the spring of 1775, General Thomas Gage, the British governor of Massachusetts, received instructions from England to seize all stores of weapons and gunpowder accessible to the American insurgents. On April 18, he ordered British troops to march against the Patriot arsenal at Concord and capture Patriot leaders Samuel Adams and John Hancock, known to be hiding at Lexington.

The Boston Patriots had been preparing for such a military action by the British for some time, and upon learning of the British plan, Patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes were ordered to set out to rouse the militiamen and warn Adams and Hancock. When the British troops arrived at Lexington, Adams, Hancock, and Revere had already fled to Philadelphia, and a group of militiamen were waiting. The Patriots were routed within minutes, but warfare had begun, leading to calls to arms across the Massachusetts countryside.

When the British troops reached Concord at about 7 a.m., they found themselves encircled by hundreds of armed Patriots. They managed to destroy the military supplies the Americans had collected but were soon advanced against by a gang of minutemen, who inflicted numerous casualties. Lieutenant Colonel Frances Smith, the overall commander of the British force, ordered his men to return to Boston without directly engaging the Americans. As the British retraced their 16-mile journey, their lines were constantly beset by Patriot marksmen firing at them Indian-style from behind trees, rocks, and stone walls. At Lexington, Captain Parker’s militia had its revenge, killing several British soldiers as the Red Coats hastily marched through his town. By the time the British finally reached the safety of Boston, nearly 300 British soldiers had been killed, wounded, or were missing in action. The Patriots suffered fewer than 100 casualties.

The battles of Lexington and Concord were the first battles of the American Revolution, a conflict that would escalate from a colonial uprising into a world war that, seven years later, would give birth to the independent United States of America.